A Moveable Empire

A moveable empire PDF
Author: Reşat Kasaba
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295989488
Size: 53.52 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 204
View: 4200

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This history of the Ottoman Empire focuses on the migrant groups that lived within its boundaries and their changing relationship to the state's central authorities. Mobile groups played an important role in shaping Ottoman institutions and the early republican structures of modern Turkey.

A Moveable Empire

A Moveable Empire PDF
Author: Resat Kasaba
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 9780295801490
Size: 63.69 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 216
View: 561

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A Moveable Empire examines the history of the Ottoman Empire through a new lens, focusing on the migrant groups that lived within its bounds and their changing relationship to the state's central authorities. Unlike earlier studies that take an evolutionary view of tribe-state relations -- casting the development of a state as a story in which nomadic tribes give way to settled populations -- this book argues that mobile groups played an important role in shaping Ottoman institutions and, ultimately, the early republican structures of modern Turkey. Over much of the empire's long history, local interests influenced the development of the Ottoman state as authorities sought to enlist and accommodate the various nomadic groups in the region. In the early years of the empire, maintaining a nomadic presence, especially in frontier regions, was an important source of strength. Cooperation between the imperial center and tribal leaders provided the center with an effective way of reaching distant parts of the empire, while allowing tribal leaders to perpetuate their own authority and guarantee the tribes' survival as bearers of distinct cultures and identities. This relationship changed in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, as indigenous communities discovered new possibilities for expanding their own economic and political power by pursuing local, regional, and even global opportunities, independent of the Ottoman center. The loose, flexible relationship between the Ottoman center and migrant communities became a liability under these changing conditions, and the Ottoman state took its first steps toward settling tribes and controlling migrations. Finally, in the early twentieth century, mobility took another form entirely as ethnicity-based notions of nationality led to forced migrations.

States Of Separation

States of Separation PDF
Author: Laura Robson
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520965663
Size: 50.95 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 244
View: 1079

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Across the Middle East in the post–World War I era, European strategic moves converged with late Ottoman political practice and a newly emboldened Zionist movement to create an unprecedented push to physically divide ethnic and religious minorities from Arab Muslim majorities. States of Separation tells how the interwar Middle East became a site for internationally sanctioned experiments in ethnic separation enacted through violent strategies of population transfer and ethnic partition. During Britain’s and France’s interwar occupation of Iraq, Palestine, and Syria, the British and French mandate governments and the League of Nations undertook a series of varied but linked campaigns of ethnic removal and separation targeting the Armenian, Assyrian, and Jewish communities within these countries. Such schemes served simultaneously as a practical method of controlling colonial subjects and as a rationale for imposing a neo-imperial international governance, with long-standing consequences for the region. Placing the histories of Iraq, Palestine, and Syria within a global context of emerging state systems intent on creating new forms of international authority, in States of Separation Laura Robson sheds new light on the emergence of ethnic separatism in the modern Middle East.

The Margins Of Empire

The Margins of Empire PDF
Author: Janet Klein
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804777756
Size: 27.56 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 288
View: 1934

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At the turn of the twentieth century, the Ottoman state identified multiple threats in its eastern regions. In an attempt to control remote Kurdish populations, Ottoman authorities organized them into a tribal militia and gave them the task of subduing a perceived Armenian threat. Following the story of this militia, Klein explores the contradictory logic of how states incorporate groups they ultimately aim to suppress and how groups who seek autonomy from the state often attempt to do so through state channels. In the end, Armenian revolutionaries were not suppressed and Kurdish leaders, whose authority the state sought to diminish, were empowered. The tribal militia left a lasting impact on the region and on state-society and Kurdish-Turkish relations. Putting a human face on Ottoman-Kurdish histories while also addressing issues of state-building, local power dynamics, violence, and dispossession, this book engages vividly in the study of the paradoxes inherent in modern statecraft.

Nature And Empire In Ottoman Egypt

Nature and Empire in Ottoman Egypt PDF
Author: Alan Mikhail
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139499552
Size: 36.27 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages :
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In one of the first ever environmental histories of the Ottoman Empire, Alan Mikhail examines relations between the empire and its most lucrative province of Egypt. Based on both the local records of various towns and villages in rural Egypt and the imperial orders of the Ottoman state, this book charts how changes in the control of natural resources fundamentally altered the nature of Ottoman imperial sovereignty in Egypt and throughout the empire. In revealing how Egyptian peasants were able to use their knowledge and experience of local environments to force the hand of the imperial state, Nature and Empire in Ottoman Egypt tells a story of the connections of empire stretching from canals in the Egyptian countryside to the palace in Istanbul, from the forests of Anatolia to the shores of the Red Sea, and from a plague flea's bite to the fortunes of one of the most powerful states of the early modern world.

A History Of The Ottoman Empire

A History of the Ottoman Empire PDF
Author: Douglas A. Howard
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108107478
Size: 33.25 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages :
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Covering the full history of the Ottoman Empire, from its genesis in post-Mongol Eurasia to its dissolution after the Great War in Europe, this textbook takes a holistic approach, considering the Ottoman worldview - what it was, how it came together, and how it fell apart. Douglas A. Howard stresses the crucial role of the Ottoman sultans and their extended household, discusses the evolution of the empire's fiscal model, and analyzes favorite works of Ottoman literature, emphasizing spirituality, the awareness of space and time, and emotions, migration, violence, disease, and disaster. Following how people spent their time, their attitudes towards authority, how they made their money, and their sense of humor and sense of beauty, this illustrated textbook is an essential resource for graduate and advanced undergraduate, courses on the history of the Ottoman Empire, the Middle East, Islamic history, and the history of Eastern Europe. The book includes over eighty illustrations, maps and textboxes.

Ruler Visibility And Popular Belonging In The Ottoman Empire 1808 1908

Ruler Visibility and Popular Belonging in the Ottoman Empire  1808 1908 PDF
Author: Darin N. Stephanov
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 1474441432
Size: 37.95 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 256
View: 3056

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This book argues that the periodic ceremonial intrusion into the everyday lives of people across the Ottoman Empire, which the annual royal birthday and accession-day celebrations constituted, had multiple, far-reaching and largely unexplored consequences. On the one hand, it brought ordinary subjects into symbolic contact with the monarch and forged lasting vertical ties of loyalty to him, irrespective of language, location, creed or class. On the other hand, the rounds of royal celebration played a key role in the creation of new types of horizontal ties and ethnic group consciousness that crystallized into national movements and, after the empire's demise, national monarchies.

The Climate Of Rebellion In The Early Modern Ottoman Empire

The Climate of Rebellion in the Early Modern Ottoman Empire PDF
Author: Sam White
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139499491
Size: 69.66 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages :
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The Climate of Rebellion in the Early Modern Ottoman Empire explores the serious and far-reaching impacts of Little Ice Age climate fluctuations in Ottoman lands. This study demonstrates how imperial systems of provisioning and settlement that defined Ottoman power in the 1500s came unraveled in the face of ecological pressures and extreme cold and drought, leading to the outbreak of the destructive Celali Rebellion (1595–1610). This rebellion marked a turning point in Ottoman fortunes, as a combination of ongoing Little Ice Age climate events, nomad incursions and rural disorder postponed Ottoman recovery over the following century, with enduring impacts on the region's population, land use and economy.

Tribes And Empire On The Margins Of Nineteenth Century Iran

Tribes and Empire on the Margins of Nineteenth Century Iran PDF
Author: Arash Khazeni
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295800755
Size: 28.21 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 304
View: 1189

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Tribes and Empire on the Margins of Nineteenth-Century Iran traces the history of the Bakhtiyari tribal confederacy of the Zagros Mountains through momentous times that saw the opening of their territory to the outside world. As the Qajar dynasty sought to integrate the peoples on its margins into the state, the British Empire made commercial inroads into the once inaccessible mountains on the frontier between Iran and Iraq. The distance between the state and the tribes was narrowed through imperial projects that included the building of a road through the mountains, the gathering of geographical and ethnographic information, and the exploration for oil, which culminated during the Iranian Constitutional Revolution. These modern projects assimilated autonomous pastoral nomadic tribes on the peripheries of Qajar Iran into a wider imperial territory and the world economy. Tribal subjects did not remain passive amidst these changes in environment and society, however, and projects of empire in the hinterlands of Iran were always mediated through encounters, accommodation, and engagement with the tribes. In contrast to the range of literature on the urban classes and political center in Qajar Iran, Arash Khazeni adopts a view from the Bakhtiyari tents on the periphery. Drawing upon Persian chronicles, tribal histories, and archival sources from London, Tehran, and Isfahan, this book opens new ground by approaching nineteenth-century Iran from its edge and placing the tribal periphery at the heart of a tale about empire and assimilation in the modern Middle East.

Natural Disasters In The Ottoman Empire

Natural Disasters in the Ottoman Empire PDF
Author: Yaron Ayalon
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316195260
Size: 57.65 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages :
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This book explores the history of natural disasters in the Ottoman Empire and the responses to them on the state, communal, and individual levels. Yaron Ayalon argues that religious boundaries between Muslims and non-Muslims were far less significant in Ottoman society than commonly believed. Furthermore, the emphasis on Islamic principles and the presence of Islamic symbols in the public domain were measures the state took to enhance its reputation and political capital - occasional discrimination of non-Muslims was only a by-product of these measures. This study sheds new light on flight and behavioral patterns in response to impending disasters by combining historical evidence with studies in social psychology and sociology. Employing an approach that mixes environmental and social history with the psychology of disasters, this work asserts that the handling of such disasters was crucial to both the rise and the fall of the Ottoman Empire.

The Ottoman Empire In The Tanzimat Era

The Ottoman Empire in the Tanzimat Era PDF
Author: Yonca Köksal
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0429812515
Size: 22.58 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 194
View: 4726

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The Ottoman Empire in the Tanzimat Era generates a new history of the Ottoman Empire’s Tanzimat reforms in the provinces of Edirne and Ankara. It studies variation across the two provinces and the crucial role of local intermediaries such as notables, tribal leaders, and merchants. The book provides insights into how states and societies transform each other in the most difficult of times using qualitative and quantitative social network analysis and deep research in the Ottoman and British archives to understand the Tanzimat as a process of negotiation and transformation between the state and local actors. The author argues that the same reform policies produced different results in Edirne and Ankara. The book explains how factors such as socioeconomic conditions and historical developments played a role in shaping local networks. The Ottoman Empire in the Tanzimat Era invites readers to rethink taken-for-granted concepts such as centralization, decentralization, state control, and imperial decay. It will be of interest to scholars and students interested in Middle Eastern and Balkan studies, and historical and political sociology.

Plague And Empire In The Early Modern Mediterranean World

Plague and Empire in the Early Modern Mediterranean World PDF
Author: Nükhet Varlik
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316351823
Size: 33.51 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages :
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This is the first systematic scholarly study of the Ottoman experience of plague during the Black Death pandemic and the centuries that followed. Using a wealth of archival and narrative sources, including medical treatises, hagiographies and travellers' accounts, as well as recent scientific research, Nükhet Varlik demonstrates how plague interacted with the environmental, social, and political structures of the Ottoman Empire from the late medieval through the early modern era. The book argues that the empire's growth transformed the epidemiological patterns of plague by bringing diverse ecological zones into interaction and by intensifying the mobilities of exchange among both human and non-human agents. Varlik maintains that persistent plagues elicited new forms of cultural imagination and expression, as well as a new body of knowledge about the disease. In turn, this new consciousness sharpened the Ottoman administrative response to the plague, while contributing to the makings of an early modern state.

Britain S Levantine Empire 1914 1923

Britain s Levantine Empire  1914 1923 PDF
Author: Daniel-Joseph MacArthur-Seal
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0192895761
Size: 71.83 MB
Format: PDF
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 304
View: 6780

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Britain's Levantine Empire, 1914-1923 tells a unique history of the impact of British soldiers and government policy on the Eastern Mediterranean during the First World War and its aftermath.

Legacies Of Empire

Legacies of Empire PDF
Author: Sandra Halperin
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107109469
Size: 70.32 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 265
View: 6899

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This book reveals how the structures and practices of past empires interact with and shape contemporary 'national' ones.

Empires And Indigenes

Empires and Indigenes PDF
Author: Wayne E. Lee
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814753094
Size: 15.46 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 305
View: 5164

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The early modern period (c. 1500–1800) of world history is characterized by the establishment and aggressive expansion of European empires, and warfare between imperial powers and indigenous peoples was a central component of the quest for global dominance. From the Portuguese in Africa to the Russians and Ottomans in Central Asia, empire builders could not avoid military interactions with native populations, and many discovered that imperial expansion was impossible without the cooperation, and, in some cases, alliances with the natives they encountered in the new worlds they sought to rule. Empires and Indigenes is a sweeping examination of how intercultural interactions between Europeans and indigenous people influenced military choices and strategic action. Ranging from the Muscovites on the western steppe to the French and English in North America, it analyzes how diplomatic and military systems were designed to accommodate the demands and expectations of local peoples, who aided the imperial powers even as they often became subordinated to them. Contributors take on the analytical problem from a variety of levels, from the detailed case studies of the different ways indigenous peoples could be employed, to more comprehensive syntheses and theoretical examinations of diplomatic processes, ethnic soldier mobilization, and the interaction of culture and military technology. Warfare and Culture series Contributors: Virginia Aksan, David R. Jones, Marjoleine Kars, Wayne E. Lee, Mark Meuwese, Douglas M. Peers, Geoffrey Plank, Jenny Hale Pulsipher, and John K. Thornton

Refugees In Europe 1919 1959

Refugees in Europe  1919 1959 PDF
Author: Matthew Frank
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 147258564X
Size: 50.15 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 272
View: 7046

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Refugees in Europe, 1919-1959 offers a new history of Europe's mid-20th century as seen through its recurrent refugee crises. By bringing together in one volume recent research on a range of different contexts of groups of refugees and refugee policy, it sheds light on the common assumptions that underpinned the history of refugees throughout the period under review. The essays foreground the period between the end of the First World War, which inaugurated a series of new international structures to deal with displaced populations, and the late 1950s, when Europe's home-grown refugee problems had supposedly been 'solved' and attention shifted from the identification of an exclusively European refugee problem to a global one. Borrowing from E. H. Carr's The Twenty Years' Crisis, first published in 1939, the editors of this volume test the idea that the two post-war eras could be represented as a single crisis of a European-dominated international order of nation states in the face of successive refugee crises which were both the direct consequence of that system and a challenge to it. Each of the chapters reflects on the utility and limitations of this notion of a 'forty years' crisis' for understanding the development of specific national and international responses to refugees in the mid-20th century. Contributors to the volume also provide alternative readings of the history of an international refugee regime, in which the non-European and colonial world are assigned a central role in the narrative.